The power of the demo

Peter Thompson’s wonderful “TGI Mondays” blog this morning really got me thinking – have a read / listen & see what you think.  It’s all about the power of actually demonstrating your offer.

What it got me thinking was: how can I demonstrate what I do without actually doing it?  It’s a challenge many of us face, if our “product” is actually a service.

One way that’s suggested by marketing consultants, especially for coaches etc, is just to “open the loops” – in other words, make people aware with your questionning that they have a problem.  Done well, the fact that you’re asking the right questions implies that you know what you’re talking about, and that you can lead the prospect to the solution, if they just become a client.

I have some ethical challenges with that.  How often do you see an invitation to attend a webinar, teleconference, or even physical seminar that promises things it doesn’t deliver?  “Find out how to get rich trading stocks & shares” the headline promises; and when you’ve sat there for a couple of hours, you can see that there’s all sorts of stuff you’ve been doing wrong – but you still don’t know what to do right.  For that you have to attend the full weekend seminar, “at only x thousand dollars”.

Now don’t get me wrong – I’m not saying that people who’ve spend years working out how to help people make money on stocks / buy property below market value / lose weight / stop smoking  … even decide what opportunities to go for 😉 … should give away all their valuable knowledge for free.  Far from it.  What I’m saying is we have to be very careful not to promise that our demo sessions will provide actual solutions if they won’t.

When I do talks, I generally don’t promise to show people how to focus – I promise to tell them why focus is important for business success.  If they want to know how, they’ll need to hire me.  And if it’s the kind of gig where the audience expects to go away with some how-to, it’ll be billed as “the essentials”, and they’ll get the essentials, valuable information but by no means the full programme.  It’s all about integrity – if someone’s giving up their valuable time to be at your seminar or on your phone call, you really do have to give them what you said they’d get.

About Andrew Horder

Founder of the blog at TheBusyFool.com, Andrew has been working with business owners for many years, helping them find and maintain their unique Focus - those activities and opportunities that they love, and will produce their success, what Andrew calls your Joyful Genius! Andrew's first book, The Busy Fool's a to Z of Loving Work is available from Amazon http://andrewhorder.com/amazon-azlw
About The Author

Andrew Horder

Founder of the blog at TheBusyFool.com, Andrew has been working with business owners for many years, helping them find and maintain their unique Focus - those activities and opportunities that they love, and will produce their success, what Andrew calls your Joyful Genius! Andrew's first book, The Busy Fool's a to Z of Loving Work is available from Amazon http://andrewhorder.com/amazon-azlw